Election Day Information

Where is my polling place?

Am I entitled to time off for voting on Election Day?

What identification can I bring to the polling place?

What time are the polls open on Election Day?

I did not receive my yellow card?

Do I have to vote according to party affiliation?

How do I switch political parties?

I will be will out of town on Election Day. How can I vote?

What is the difference between a Plurality Election vs. a Majority Election?

 


Q: Where is my polling place?

A: You can find your polling place by giving us a call at 808-453-VOTE (8683).

Q: Am I entitled to time off for voting on Election Day?

A: If you are working on Election Day, you may be entitled to a maximum of two consecutive hours off from work in order to vote. Voters shall not be subject to any penalty, rescheduling of normal hours, or deductions from salary or wages because of such absence.

The law does not apply to employees whose work hours include a period of two consecutive hours while the polls are open when the employee is not working for the employer. Polling place hours are 7:00 AM to 6:00 PM.

Learn more about time off for voting.

Q: What identification can I bring to the polling place?

A: Forms of acceptable identification include a valid photo ID (Drivers License, State ID, etc), a copy of a current utility bill, bank statement, paycheck, or other government issued document that shows your name and address.

Q: What time are the polls open on Election Day?

A: Polls are open from 7:00 AM to 6:00 PM. If you are in line at 6:00 PM, you will be allowed to vote.

Q: I did not receive my yellow card.

A: Contact your Clerk’s Office to find out the status of your Voter Notification and Address Confirmation (Yellow Card).

Q: Do I have to vote according to party affiliation?

A: Voters are not required to declare a political party preference prior to voting. However, voters should know that Hawaii conducts a single party primary election in which voters select candidates from the party of their choice. A voter’s choice of party and candidates remain secret as provided by the Hawaii State Constitution.

Q: How do I switch political parties?

A: Individuals should contact their political parties directly for more information regarding membership.

Voters are not required to declare a party preference prior to voting. The Hawaii State Constitution provides for the secrecy of the vote, including the voter’s political party selection.

Q: I will be out of town on Election Day. How can I vote?

A: You can request a mail ballot by completing a Wikiwiki Absentee Application and submitting it to your Clerk’s Office. You can also vote at an early walk-in location – dates and locations are available closer to elections.

Learn more about early voting.

Q: What is the difference between a Plurality Election vs. a Majority Election?

Plurality Elections

In elections that are decided by plurality, the candidate who receives the most votes wins the election. The candidate does not need a certain percentage of the votes to be elected.

Majority Elections

Majority is defined as: “At least 50% of the votes plus one or a number greater than half of the total votes cast.”

If no candidate receives a majority of the votes, the two candidates that received the highest number of votes move on to the general election, where a winner is then determined by who receives the most votes (plurality).


Additional questions? Contact the Office of Elections or your Clerk’s Office.